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Amphipolis Tomb Held Five Individuals

Tuesday, January 20, 2015

AMPHIPOLIS, GREECE—The bones of at least five people had been buried in the tomb at Amphipolis, according to an announcement made by the Greek Ministry of Culture and reported in The Telegraph. Archaeologists identified the bones of a woman over the age of 60, a newborn baby, two men aged between 35 and 45, and the cremated remains of an adult of indeterminate age. The bones of one of the men bore signs of injury from a sword or a dagger. It has been suggested that the opulent tomb, which dates to between 325 B.C. and 300 B.C., may have belonged to Alexander the Great’s mother, who was murdered, along with his widow, son, and half-brother. The bones will be tested to try to determine if the woman and the two men were related. “Part of the analysis will look into a possible blood relationship… but the lack of teeth and cranial parts that are used in ancient DNA analysis may not allow for a successful identification,” the Ministry of Culture revealed. For more on the tomb, see "Top 10 Discoveries of 2014: Amphipolis."

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