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Survey Recovers Artifacts From Scotland’s Battle of Killiecrankie

Thursday, March 03, 2016

Scotland Killiecrankie Jacobite PITLOCHRY, SCOTLAND—A copper alloy pendant, a harness boss, two buckles, part of the support for a sword belt, horseshoes, buttons, and musket munitions were recovered by archaeologists from GUARD Archaeology, who conducted a survey at the site of the Battle of Killiecrankie ahead of road construction in the region. On July 27, 1689, Jacobites led by John Graham of Claverhouse, also known as “Bonnie Dundee,” faced King William’s troops under the command of General Hugh Mackay of Scourie. Grenades are thought to have been used for the first time in the United Kingdom during this battle. And even though the Jacobites won the day, one-third of them died, including their leader. “Thanks to the survey work, experts are shedding more light on the Battle of Killiecrankie which took place over three hundred years ago, bringing “Bonnie Dundee’s” Jacobite victory to life. They are able to offer more information on the battle including the possible route soldiers took during the battle, potential cavalry positions, where the key skirmishes and close quarters fighting took place, and the likely retreating route taken by the fleeing Government forces,” Transport Minister Derek Mackay told students at Pitlochry High School, reported in a press release. To read more about historical archaeology in Scotland, go to "Living on the Edge."

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