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Scientists Examine Kazakhstan’s Geoglyphs

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

 

ISTANBUL, TURKEY—Irina Shevnina and Andrew Logvin of Kostanay University and colleagues from Vilnius University presented the initial results of their research into the more than 50 geoglyphs that cross northern Kazakhstan at the annual meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists. They have conducted archaeological investigations and ground-penetrating radar surveys, and they have taken aerial photographs of the geometric structures, which were initially spotted with satellite images. The earthen squares, rings, and crosses may have been used to mark ownership of land. One of the structures is the ancient swastika design fashioned from timber. Hearths and structures at the geoglyphs suggest that they could have been used in ritual activity. “As of today, we can say only one thing—the geoglyphs were built by ancient people. By whom and for what purpose, remains a mystery,” Shevnina and Logvin told Live Science. To read about Peru's famous geoglyphs, see ARCHAEOLOGY'S "Rituals of the Nasca Lines."

 

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