Subscribe to Archaeology

Sixth-Century B.C. House Unearthed in Rome

Thursday, September 10, 2015

Rome Early HouseROME, ITALY—ANSAmed reports that a house dating to the sixth century B.C. has been unearthed on Rome’s Quirinal Hill, near a fifth-century temple that was discovered in 2013. “The position of the house near the temple hints at it being a sacred area, and that whoever lived there was watching over what happened therein. But it is even more important that we can now retro-date the urbanization of the Quirinal zone,” archaeologist and director of the excavation Mirella Serlorenzi said at a press conference. “This means that Rome at the beginning of the sixth century was much larger than what we expected and not closed in around the Forum,” she added. The rectangular house, built on a tufa stone base, likely had two rooms and an entrance with a portico. It’s wooden walls had been covered with clay, and the structure had a tile roof. It had been thought that this area was used as a necropolis at the time. For more, go to "A Brief Glimpse of Early Rome."

Advertisement

Advertisement


Advertisement