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Neanderthal Teeth Show Evidence of Dentistry

Thursday, June 29, 2017

Croatia Neanderthal Dentistry KUKRAPINA, CROATIA—Evidence found in teeth at a Neanderthal site in Croatia points to rudimentary attempts at dentistry 130,000 years ago, according to a report in The Independent. David Frayer of the University of Kansas analyzed the teeth—found in the early 20th century at the site of Krapina—and observed grooves, scratches, and chips consistent with the use of a simple toothpick-like tool. Based on the pattern of markings on the individual's teeth, Frayer believes the Neanderthal may have been attempting to ease the pain of an impacted molar. To read more on the archaeology of dentistry, go to “Not So Pearly Whites.”

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