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106-Year-Old “Edible” Fruitcake Found in Antarctica

Monday, August 14, 2017

England York GospelsCHRISTCHURCH, NEW ZEALAND—A fruitcake that predates the outbreak of World War I has been discovered in Antarctica, according to a report from BBC News. The 106-year-old delicacy was found by a team from the New Zealand–based Antarctic Heritage Trust on Cape Adare. It is thought to have belonged to members of a team led by British explorer Robert Falcon Scott. The tin holding the cake was somewhat rusty, but the cake itself was found to be in good condition—and even smelled edible. The cake was uncovered in Antarctica’s oldest building, a hut built in 1899 by a team led by Norwegian explorer Carsten Borchgrevink and used by some members of Scott's team during their 1911 Terra Nova expedition. Scott was known to have been fond of the fruitcake, which was made by the biscuit company Huntley and Palmers. Conservators have uncovered some 1,500 items in the hut, including well-preserved jams and poorly preserved meat and fish. Although Scott and his team reached the South Pole, a Norwegian team got there just over a month ahead of them, and Scott and four of his team members died on their return to the base. For more, go to “The Third Reich’s Arctic Outpost.”

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