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Luwian Scholar Translates Possible Sea Peoples Inscription

Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Luwian inscription translatedBEYKÖY, TURKEY—According to a report in Live Science, Fred Woudhuizen, a Dutch scholar of the ancient language known as Luwian, has translated a 3,200-year-old inscription discovered in the late nineteenth century on a 95-foot stretch of stone at an archaeological site in Beyköy, a town located near Turkey’s Black Sea coast. The ancient stone, said to have been recycled in local building project, no longer exists, but a copy of the inscription was reportedly found in the estate of archaeologist James Mellaart, remembered for his excavation of Turkey’s 9,500-year-old city of Çatalhöyük. Assisted by Swiss geoarchaeologist Eberhard Zangger, Woudhuizen says the inscription describes how King Kupantakuruntas came to rule the kingdoms of Mira and Troy, and how the two kingdoms engaged in naval campaign, led by the Trojan prince Muksus, against Ashkelon. Woudhuizen and Zangger think it would have been difficult for Mellaart, who was part of an earlier translation team as an expert on the archaeology of western Turkey, to forge such a long text in Luwian. They cannot be certain that the text is authentic, however, until records of the inscription are found apart from Mellaart’s estate. To read in-depth about another ancient inscription discovered in Turkey, go to “In Search of a Philosopher’s Stone.”

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