search
Archaeology Magazine

A publication of the Archaeological Institute of America

archaeology
subscribe
Special Introductory Offer!

Traces of a Neolithic Longhouse Uncovered in Denmark

Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Denmark Neolithic longhouseVINGE, DENMARK—The postholes of a 4,000-year-old dwelling have been uncovered at a construction site in Denmark, according to a report in The Copenhagen Post. Found on the northern island of Zealand, the outline of soil stains indicates the house measured nearly 150 feet long and more than 20 feet wide. It had two aisles, where archaeologists think a wealthy family lived with their farmhands and livestock. “It proved to be a gigantic farmhouse from the Late Neolithic Period,” said Jens Johannsen of the Roskilde Museum. “The house is nearly three times as big as other houses from this period, and it is the only one like it in the area.” For more on archaeology in Denmark, go to “Bronze Age Bride.”

Advertisement

Advertisement


Advertisement