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Archaeology Magazine

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Face of Eighteenth-Century “Witch” Reconstructed

Tuesday, October 31, 2017

Scotland witchcraft reconstructionDUNDEE, SCOTLAND—According to a report in BBC News, forensic artist Christopher Rynn of Dundee University’s Center for Anatomy and Human Identification used twentieth-century photographs of a now missing skull to create a 3-D digital reconstruction of Lilias Adie, a Scottish woman who died in 1704 while imprisoned for the crime of witchcraft. In the nineteenth century, her remains were exhumed from a grave on the Fife coast that had been covered with a large stone, presumably to keep her from rising from the grave. Adie was tortured and interrogated in prison in an effort to get her to name other women as witches. But she only pointed the finger at those who had already been named. Adie is thought to have taken her own life. To read about archaeological evidence for witchcraft in the British Isles, go to "The Witches of Cornwall." 

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