search
Archaeology Magazine

A publication of the Archaeological Institute of America

archaeology
subscribe
Special Introductory Offer!

10,000-Year-Old Ochre “Crayon” Discovered in England

Friday, January 26, 2018

Mesolithic ochre crayonYORK, ENGLAND—BBC News reports that researchers from the University of York have studied two pieces of ochre recovered in North Yorkshire, in an area near the Mesolithic site of Star Carr, where more than 30 red deer antler headdresses and a pendant were found in 2015. The first piece of ochre, described as a crayon by archaeologist Andy Needham, measures less than one inch long, and is rounded on one end and pointed at the other. The second piece of ochre is shaped like a pebble. Its surface is heavily striated, suggesting it had been scraped to produce red pigment powder. Needham suggests the ochre may have been used by Mesolithic artists to apply color to decorative works or animal skins. To read about another discovery at Star Carr, go to “Mesolithic Markings.”

Advertisement

Advertisement


Advertisement