search
Archaeology Magazine

A publication of the Archaeological Institute of America

archaeology
subscribe
Special Introductory Offer!

Storms Reveal Roman Aqueduct in Spain

Tuesday, March 06, 2018

CÁDIZ, SPAIN—The Daily Telegraph reports that last week’s heavy storms and shifting sands revealed a first-century A.D. Roman aqueduct and a seventeenth-century road in southwestern Spain. The 50-mile-long aqueduct of Gades carried water to Cádiz from the springs of Tempul, and is thought to have been one of the largest in the Roman Empire. “We knew the aqueduct’s route passed this way but we had never seen it,” said Moisés Camacho of the Association for the Investigation and Dissemination of Cádiz’s Heritage. Two of the five fragments that have been uncovered are still held together with ancient mortar. The road uncovered by the storm was destroyed in 1755 by a tsunami triggered by an earthquake in Lisbon. Scholars think it may have been built over an earlier Roman road or parallel to one that is now under the sea. For more, go to “Spain’s Silver Boom.”

Advertisement

Advertisement


Advertisement