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4,000-Year-Old Burials Unearthed in Northern India

Thursday, May 2, 2019

India Harappan coffinsNEW DELHI, INDIA—According to a report in The Daily Pioneer, an excavation led by SK Manjul of the Archaeological Survey of India has uncovered 4,000-year-old burials at the Harappan site of Sanauli, which is located on the bank of the River Yamuna in northern India. The burials are thought to have consisted of wooden coffins resting on platforms with “legs,” or pillars. One of the “legged coffins,” decorated with stone inlays, held a woman’s skeleton. Traces of a bow, bone points, an armlet of semiprecious stones, gold beads, and pottery were found in her burial. A second platform held the remains of a woman, a copper mirror, a hairpin, and beads. Two large pots under her platform may have held food such as rice, dal made from black lentils, and the remains of cattle and wild pigs. Mongoose remains were also recovered. Three chariots, shields, swords, and helmets that may have belonged to a warrior class have also been discovered at the site. To read about another recent discovery in India, go to "India's Temple Island."

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