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Vendor Booths Identified at Woodstock

Wednesday, June 26, 2019

Woodstock vendor boothsBETHEL WOODS, NEW YORK—Gizmodo reports that researchers from Binghamton University’s Public Archaeology Facility, the Museum at Bethel Woods, and the Bethel Woods Center for the Arts have identified the location of 24 vendor booths in the area known as the Bindy Bazaar at the site of the Woodstock Music and Art Fair, which took place in 1969 at what was then Max Yasgur’s farm in southern New York state. Some 50,000 people were expected to attend the three-day festival, but more than 400,000 arrived and camped on the property to listen to 32 musical acts, including Joan Baez, Janis Joplin, The Who, and Jimi Hendrix. Archaeologist Maria O’Donovan of Binghamton University said the recent survey revealed stacked stones that marked the placement of the booths, where people gathered to sell, trade, and barter goods, in an arrangement that is inconsistent with a 1969 map of the site. The booths reflect how the festival took on a life of its own, O’Donovan explained, beyond what was planned by its organizers. Very little evidence of drug paraphernalia was found during the surface survey, she added. For more on archaeology at the site of Woodstock, go to “Can You Dig It, Man?

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