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Remains of Possible Holocaust Victim Found in Czech Republic

Friday, September 6, 2019

LETY U PISKU, CZECH REPUBLIC—Romea.cz reports that the skeleton of a woman whose teeth had been knocked out has been found in a shallow grave at a memorial dedicated to Holocaust victims, near the site of a World War II–era concentration camp for Romani people in the western Czech Republic. The woman was buried in a wooden coffin about 5 feet below the ground. Lucie Horáková of the Museum of Romani Culture said the bones may belong to a Romani victim of the camp, and could mark the location of mass graves. “It is now necessary to perform an analysis of the DNA in order to determine with certainty whether or not these remains belong to a camp victim,” she said. Historic records indicate that some 1,300 Romani men, women, and children were held at the camp between August 1942 and May 1943. More than 300 prisoners died at the camp, while more than 500 were sent to Auschwitz. As many as 90 percent of the Roma living in Bohemia and Moravia are thought to have been killed by the Nazis. To read more about the Romani, Europe's largest minority group, go to "World Roundup: India."

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