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Neanderthal Child’s Tooth Discovered in Italy

Friday, September 18, 2020

Italy Neanderthal ToothBOLOGNA, ITALY—According to a statement released by the University of Bologna, researchers from the University of Bologna and the University of Ferrara have uncovered a Neanderthal child’s milk tooth in northern Italy’s Broion Cave. The child is thought to have been 11 or 12 years old when it died between some 45,000 to 48,000 years ago, making the child one of the last Neanderthals to live in Italy. Analysis of DNA recovered from the small canine tooth indicates the child was related, on its mother’s side, to Neanderthals whose remains have been recovered in Belgium. Stefano Benazzi of the University of Bologna said the information will help researchers to understand how Neanderthals went extinct in Europe. To read about another Neanderthal child's tooth found in the Zagros Mountains, go to "World Roundup: Iran."

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