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Remains Unearthed in Cork May Reflect 16th-Century Rebellions

Tuesday, June 14, 2022

CORK, IRELAND—The Journal.ie reports that an examination of skeletal remains discovered in a mass grave during the demolition of a pub in Cork City has revealed that the bones belonged to four men, who were between the ages of 18 and 25 when they met a violent end with their hands tied behind their backs. Osteoarchaeologist Niamh Daly said that their feet may have also been bound together. Radiocarbon dating indicates the deaths occurred between A.D. 1447 and 1636. The remains of another two young men who had also been buried in shallow graves were recovered nearby. All of the men are thought to have been soldiers who may have been involved in one of several rebellions against English rule that occurred in the late sixteenth century and early seventeenth century. The continuing investigation is expected to provide greater clarity and accuracy of this burial date. To read about Ireland's most notorious prison in Cork Harbor, go to "Letter from Ireland: The Sorrows of Spike Island."

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