search
Archaeology Magazine

A publication of the Archaeological Institute of America

archaeology
subscribe
Special Introductory Offer!

Cadaver Dogs Identify Possible Revolutionary War Graves

Friday, March 02, 2018

Kettle Creek gravesWASHINGTON, GEORGIA—According to a Fox News report, cadaver dogs detected more than two dozen possible war graves at the 400-acre Battle of Kettle Creek site in northern Georgia. On February 14, 1779, American soldiers led by Andrew Pickens defeated a Loyalist militia in a two-hour surprise attack. As many as 80 soldiers are thought to have been buried across the wooded battlefield. Archaeologist Tom Gresham and his team have examined five of the spots identified by the dogs with ground-penetrating radar. The researchers found shallow pits with clusters of rocks, but none of the traditional burial markers, such as teeth or jacket buttons. White crosses have been placed where soldiers are thought to have fallen. “That will help tell the story more precisely of where the troops were, where they were firing from, what positions they were defending,” Gresham explained. For more on the archaeology of the American Revolution, go to “Finding Parker’s Revenge.”

Advertisement

Advertisement


Advertisement